Publishing News: My Short Story Gets Flushed

One of my short fiction pieces, The Other Foot, which I just recently read along with a gathering of other authors at Warren County Community College, has been selected to appear in the latest anthology from Portable Press, Uncle John’s Flush Fiction. As they describe it on their Amazon page:

Prepare to be entertained by this unique collection of short-short stories–all fewer than 1,000 words–handpicked by the master story-teller himself, Uncle John. Whatever genre you’re into–humor, mystery, romance, horror, adventure, sci-fi, or slice-of-life–it’s in here. Continue reading

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Author Appearance: A Little Hike

Reading of an excerpt from the short story A Little Hike, by author S. Michael Wilson (that’s me), at the Visiting Authors Series held at Warren County Community College.

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Rejection Junction

Classical ideal feedback model. The feedback i...

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I received a rejection notice this morning for a short story I’ve been shopping around. It’s the sixth rejection for this piece, and I have been fortunate to receive personal feedback with all of them. Unfortunately, the feedback has not been unanimous.

Why do I say unfortunately? It all comes down to the problem of deciding which feedback to consider, and which feedback to ignore. This topic came up a couple of time in the creative nonfiction workshop I was involved with last fall, as many of the younger students were facing this dilemma for the first time. Primarily used to receiving critical analysis from one or two authority figures (teachers, professors) and general encouragement from less critical audiences (friends, family members), they now found themselves on the receiving end of often contradictory opinions and advice from a room full of people not only intimately familiar with the written word, but the creative process as well. It’s one thing to have your friends read your work and either “like” it or “not get” it, but something completely different to be receiving in-depth critiques from a dozen or so fellow writers. Continue reading